Reports on USA - New Hampshire

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5 Results Found

Subject Reports in USA - New Hampshire:

Subject
usa-new hampshire   Energy Efficiency in USA - New Hampshire
  North America
usa-new hampshire   Hazardous Waste in USA - New Hampshire
  North America
usa-new hampshire   Packaging and Labeling in USA - New Hampshire
  North America
usa-new hampshire   Product Take-back in USA - New Hampshire
  North America

Restricted Substances in USA - New Hampshire:

Subject
usa-new hampshire   Restricted Substances Overview in USA - New Hampshire
  North America



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The following IHS EIATRACK content also relates to this topic:

USA - New Hampshire Reg Alerts

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July 9, 2009
Maine, New Hampshire, and Texas Product Take-Back Update
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July 1, 2009
Subject Reports Update - USA New England States: Connecticut...
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December 14, 2007
A Survey of Upcoming Deadlines and Key Dates in the New Engl...
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August 23, 2007
New Hampshire Mercury Update
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May 29, 2007
New Hampshire Legislature Sends Mercury Bill to Governor
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June 14, 2006
New Hampshire Bans the Disposal of All Video Display Devices...

USA - New Hampshire Summary


New Hampshire has joined the states that have adopted or proposed regulatory measures to address used or discarded electronic equipment. Indeed, New Hampshire was one of the first states to enact legislation requiring manufacturers to notify the state of the content of mercury-added products, and a proposed rule to implement that requirement was approved by the Rules Committee of the legislature on April 20, 2001. Legislation has also been proposed that would incorporate more elements of the draft model legislation on mercury issued by the Northeast Waste Management Officials’ Association ("NEWMOA"). A proposal to impose an advance-disposal fee on mercury-added products is pending in the legislature, and a proposal to impose an advance-disposal fee on cathode ray tubes ("CRTs"), nickel-cadmium batteries, and certain other devices, was introduced in 2000 but failed to be enacted.

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